Committees - Audencia MUN
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Committees

Choose your level

Security Council

Security Council

Level : Advanced

Humanitarian, social and economic inequalities caused by chemical weapons

Regarding the situation in Syria and all the military and humanitarian crises in the country, our principal topic will be discussing the inequalities caused by chemical weapons there. The main issues that we will cover are related to civil war, terrorism and militarization, and we will aim our delegates to link them to the use of chemical weapons. However, a conflict that has escalated to such scope cannot be limited to the mentioned themes, so delegates will be asked to deep into the conflict so as to get a fruitful debate. If you are thinking of applying to the Security Council, you’ll be discussing social inequalities caused by the Syrian war, the effects of civil war on civilians, trade and effects of chemical weapons, external financing of chemical weapons, the consequences that it all has on the refugee crises, and military interventions (taking into account the scope of Security Council). What can be done to tackle inequalities and what short and long term solutions can be set will be the common goal of the committee.

Our chairs

Teresa Tous is 21 years old, Spanish, lives in Barcelona and studies management and corporate sciences at the university of Pompeu Fabra. She attended PiMUN 2018, LiMUN 2018, MilMUN 2017, C’MUN 2016 and SeiMUN 2016. Se has chaired for several simulations at UNSA Barcelona, her student association.

Nicole Borges Esposito is currently studying law in the University of Lisbon, and received multiple awards in LisboMUn for best position paper, in Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado College (FAAP) for best delegation to New Zealand delegation and best negotiator to United Kingdom delegation.

Countries

5 permanent members:

  • France
  • China
  • UK
  • US
  • Russia

 

10 rotative:

  • Bolivia
  • Ivory coast
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Egypt
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kuwait
  • Netherlands
  • Iran
  • Poland
  • Sweden
European Council

European Council

Level : Advanced

Addressing gender pay gap and legal protection of LGBT workers and Integration of immigrants in the workplace

Addressing gender pay gap and legal protection of LGBT workers
Germany and U.K. might be two of the most developed countries in the European Union but, at the same rate, they are also the most discriminating countries when retributing female salary compared to their opposite gendered co-workers. According to Eurostat, the difference is around 20%.
The recommendations of the European Commission aim to pay transparency and improving legal framework.
However, pay gap is not the only issue workers have to deal with.
LGBT workers have to face different forms of discrimination from jokes and comments about their sexual orientation to a denied access to parental leave or gender segregated facilities.

 

Integration of immigrants in the workplace
Immigrants are a significant part of a rapidly growing number of labor markets. Their integration needs to be a major component of an area’s workforce strategy, whether it is aimed at immediate high wage – skilled labor force or lower skilled workers that are awarded opportunities to pursue career pathways. However, integration in itself is not an achievable endpoint, but a highly local, two-way process which requires the engagement of all key actors in a community which addresses the existing inequalities

Our chairs

Luca de Cristofaro, 22 years old, is a Brazilian and Italian citizen. He studies political science and international relations at the university of Naples – which gives him good knowledge of the European Council and the way it operates. He got a honorable mention as a delegate in the European Council at RomeMUN in 2018, and will also participate in BerlinMUN later this year.

Isha Mandal is a student and ex-president of the MUN Society in John Cabot University. She chaired in JCUMUN 2018, and was also in charge of the MUN practices for high-schoolers. She also won Best Delegate in the International Criminal Court in SMUN 2017.

Countries

28 countries in the European Union

AFRICAN UNION

AFRICAN UNION

Level : Intermediate

Tackling political and economic corruption in Libya: towards the construction of a developped and inclusive society.

“Corruption hampers the ability of nations to prosper and grow”, declared the former UNSG Ban Ki Moon in 2012. Nevertheless, it seems that the countless statements and decisions that have been made on this issue did not succeed in preventing corruption; a scourge more than ever present all over the world, especially in Africa. Libya, as one of the most corrupted states in Africa and in the World, placed 171th out of 180 in the Corruption Perception Index (Transparency International, 2018) suffers from an ongoing internal conflict, fragile institutions and deep instability. This creates a scenario that favours corruption, without any checks on abuses due to the weakness of its institutional framework. This phenomenon affects all sectors of the Libyan society, especially the oil industry and public procurement sectors. Although corruption is far from being the only cause of socio-economic inequalities, there is a causal relationship between them. By affecting the income distribution, the use of aid flows and decision making in public goods, corruption can in fact increase economic and social imbalances. On the other hand, inequality might lead to corruptive attitudes. Thus, the goal of this committee is to discuss strategies that would encourage good governance in order to provide more opportunities for people left behind, suffering from the effects of corruption.

Our chairs

Perrine Debreu (French, 20) is a double-degree student in political science at Sciences Po Lille and in international relations at the University of Kent. She has been a delegate at the Harvard Model United Nations, OxIMUN, LIMUN, and a chair at the Middle East Environmental United Nations in Geneva and at the CASMUNC.

Daniel De Oliveira is an international relation student in Bordeaux School of Political Studies and University of Coimbra. He was a chair at the  UCIMUN 2017 and MUIMUN 2018. He is currently an academic advisor and Chair Coordinator at UCIMUN 2018, a MUN conference organized in Coimbra, Portugal.

Countries
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Benin
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Côte d’Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Egypt
  • Eritrea
  • Gabon
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kenya
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Morocco
  • Nigeria
  • Rwanda
  • Senegal
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Sudan
  • Sudan
  • Togo
  • Tunisia
  • Zimbabwe
ECOSOC

ECOSOC

Level : Intermediate and Beginner

Bridging the technology gap for a better economic and social development.

In the twenty-first century, there is still a major gap between industrialized and developing countries regarding their access to information and communications technology. This breach has come to be known as the digital divide or technology gap and is illustrative of the vast differences in development among nations resulting from the process of globalization. The technology gap is the difference between those who are able to access, diffuse and use technology, and those who cannot. It emphasizes socio-economic differences between countries which do not have the same scientific and technical opportunities, but also within countries between the poor and the rich. In that context, it is undeniable that Science, Technology and Innovation are necessities to help countries to economically thrive in the current globalized world, and it should be borne in mind that diffusion or usage of that technology is essential to enable the social development of these countries.

Our chairs

Lucas Battistelo Espindola is a 22 year-old Brazilian native, currently studying law at the University of Coimbra, Portugal.  He also studied at King’s college, London. His international background is also observable in his many MUN experiences :  Best delegate at UCIMUN 2017, best position paper award at LisboMUN 2017, chair at ELSA LxMUN, and head of Portugal’s delegation at RomeMUN.

Camille Chaumont is a student in political science at Sciences Po Lille, and part of the bi-degree Politics and International Relations at the University of Ken. Camille participated in the National MUN in New York last year, and won outstanding delegate and outstanding delegation awards.

Countries
  • Afganistan
  • Algeria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Chile
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Ecuador
  • France
  • Germany
  • India
  • Iraq
  • Japan
  • Lebanon
  • Mexico
  • Nigeria
  • Philippines
  • Republic of Korea
  • Russian Federation
  • Rwanda, Somalia
  • South Africa
  • Guyana
  • Sudan
  • Turkey
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States of America
  • Veneuela
  • Vietnam
  • Burkina Faso
  • Uganda
  • Bosnia Herzegovina
  • Peru
  • Togo
  • Spain
  • Morocco
  • Uruguay
WHO

WHO

Level : Beginner

Tackling unequal access to vaccination in developing countries

Vaccination is a key process to prevent infectious diseases spread by inoculating a less dangerous version of the disease, thus allowing the organism to adapt. According to the WHO, it prevents 2 to 3 million deaths each year. In 2012, the WHO has launched its Global Vaccine Action Plan to further develop vaccination around the world. This plan was conceived to answer a dire truth : people do not get equal access to vaccination. For instance, the measles vaccine coverage rate for the richest fifth of the population in some countries is up to 58% higher than for the poorest fifth. As representatives of your country, you have a moral, a political and an economic duty to tackle unequal access to vaccination. You must offer to your people the opportunity to live without having to fear for their lives, away from the threat of diseases.

Our chairs

Hugo Gravier, 23 years old, French, is a Master in Management student at Audencia Business School. He is a member of the Isegoria association, the one in charge of organizing Audencia MUN; he has been the head of the organization of Eloquencia, an eloquence contest between students. He has participated in MilMUN 2017 and in DAMMUN 2018, in which he got the best delegate award. He gives delegates courses at the United Nations Department of Audencia.

Andreea-Cezera Pletea is a 21 year old law student at the Université Saint-Louis of Brussels, Belgium, of Romanian origin. She has won best delegate at RomeMUN 2018, and has also participated in Université Libre de Bruxelles Model United Nations, and London Model United Nations. She has also volunteered for several causes which matter to her, like human rights, children and education.

Countries
  • US
  • UK
  • Germany
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Sweden
  • Netherlands
  • China
  • India
  • Canada
  • Brazil
  • Mexico
  • Syria
  • Thailand
  • Myanmar
  • Sri Lanka
  • Senegal
  • DRC
  • Russia
  • South Africa
  • Nigeria
  • Ethiopia
  • Malaesia
  • Japan
  • Egypt
  • Marocco
  • South Korea
  • Haiti
  • Madagascar
  • Rwanda
  • Soudan
  • Israel
  • Kazahstan
  • Lebanon
PRESS

PRESS

Level : Beginner

Audencia MUN’s Press committee

This committee’s availability will depend on the number of applicants

The Audencia MUN Press committee operates as a very distinct style of committee. Its major objective is to synthesise and provide smart and constant coverage about what is going on in classic committees. During Audencia MUN, each delegate of the Press Committee will act as a reporter from a media organisation and will represent it for the entire duration of the MUN. The delegates will be asked to manage live tweets and write press releases, as well as taking part in the decision making of the editorial board, led by the chairs. Journalists have a relative freedom of movement and can cover several committees instead of one. Moreover, covering a MUN also includes gossips ! Delegates will also have to look for stories to tell outside of the committee sessions.

Exemples of media organisations : The Guardian – CNN – Russia Today – BBC – AJ+ – China Daily …

Our chairs

Alexandre Weber, 21 years old, is a Master in Management student at Audencia Business School. He is the founder and former editor in chief of the Isegoria Press & Media Department, and is now the editor in chief of a monthly magazine. He has participated in MILMUN as a member of the ICFJ (International Center For Jounalists) and has lead training camps for future MUN delegates of Audencia BS.