Committees - Audencia MUN
16041
page-template-default,page,page-id-16041,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,qode-theme-ver-13.8,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_bottom,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.7,vc_responsive

Committees

Security Council

Security Council

Indian Revocation of Kashmir’s Special Status

After gaining their independence in 1947, the ongoing conflict in Kashmir has repeatedly caused tension over the last decades. Several wars including nations such as India and Pakistan have been caused. While both countries are claiming Kashmir in full but ruling it in part, the region was separated into Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan, with the condition of ensuring a political autonomy translated into articles 370 and 35-A in the Constitution of India. This Constitution contains many conditions guaranteeing the right to form their own legislature and create their own laws on all matters except Defence, Communications and Foreign Affairs. While some perceive these articles as a strong symbolism of the region’s autonomy, others consider it as an obstacle hindering the region’s prosperity, as well as encouraging separatism and dynasty politics.

So many measures are reviewed to solve the ongoing conflict in the region despite the difficulty to find a holistic solution to the issue.

Our chairs

Not announced yet.

Countries

5 permanent members:

  • France
  • China
  • UK
  • US
  • Russia

10 rotative:

  • Bolivia
  • Ivory coast
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Egypt
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kuwait
  • Netherlands
  • Iran
  • Poland
  • Sweden
European Council

European Council

Extending or revoking data privacy and GDPR regulations

In an increasingly digitized world, private data and cybersecurity became fundamental stakes for each citizen. In response to these topical actualities, the General Data Protection and Regulation (GDPR) has been approved by the European Commission on April 2016. Through the cooperation of companies, the aim of these regulations is to protect European citizens from cyberattacks to ensure safety for their personal data. However, these regulations have run into criticism since they can be seen as impeding economic activities: this means higher costs for personal data management and significant fines for non-compliance with these regulations.

Our chairs

Not announced yet.

Countries

28 countries in the European Union

AFRICAN UNION

AFRICAN UNION

Level : Intermediate

Tackling political and economic corruption in Libya: towards the construction of a developped and inclusive society.

“Corruption hampers the ability of nations to prosper and grow”, declared the former UNSG Ban Ki Moon in 2012. Nevertheless, it seems that the countless statements and decisions that have been made on this issue did not succeed in preventing corruption; a scourge more than ever present all over the world, especially in Africa. Libya, as one of the most corrupted states in Africa and in the World, placed 171th out of 180 in the Corruption Perception Index (Transparency International, 2018) suffers from an ongoing internal conflict, fragile institutions and deep instability. This creates a scenario that favours corruption, without any checks on abuses due to the weakness of its institutional framework. This phenomenon affects all sectors of the Libyan society, especially the oil industry and public procurement sectors. Although corruption is far from being the only cause of socio-economic inequalities, there is a causal relationship between them. By affecting the income distribution, the use of aid flows and decision making in public goods, corruption can in fact increase economic and social imbalances. On the other hand, inequality might lead to corruptive attitudes. Thus, the goal of this committee is to discuss strategies that would encourage good governance in order to provide more opportunities for people left behind, suffering from the effects of corruption.

Our chairs

Perrine Debreu (French, 20) is a double-degree student in political science at Sciences Po Lille and in international relations at the University of Kent. She has been a delegate at the Harvard Model United Nations, OxIMUN, LIMUN, and a chair at the Middle East Environmental United Nations in Geneva and at the CASMUNC.

Daniel De Oliveira is an international relation student in Bordeaux School of Political Studies and University of Coimbra. He was a chair at the  UCIMUN 2017 and MUIMUN 2018. He is currently an academic advisor and Chair Coordinator at UCIMUN 2018, a MUN conference organized in Coimbra, Portugal.

Countries
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Benin
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Côte d’Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Egypt
  • Eritrea
  • Gabon
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kenya
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Morocco
  • Nigeria
  • Rwanda
  • Senegal
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Sudan
  • Sudan
  • Togo
  • Tunisia
  • Zimbabwe
ECOSOC

ECOSOC

Level : Intermediate and Beginner

Bridging the technology gap for a better economic and social development.

In the twenty-first century, there is still a major gap between industrialized and developing countries regarding their access to information and communications technology. This breach has come to be known as the digital divide or technology gap and is illustrative of the vast differences in development among nations resulting from the process of globalization. The technology gap is the difference between those who are able to access, diffuse and use technology, and those who cannot. It emphasizes socio-economic differences between countries which do not have the same scientific and technical opportunities, but also within countries between the poor and the rich. In that context, it is undeniable that Science, Technology and Innovation are necessities to help countries to economically thrive in the current globalized world, and it should be borne in mind that diffusion or usage of that technology is essential to enable the social development of these countries.

Our chairs

Lucas Battistelo Espindola is a 22 year-old Brazilian native, currently studying law at the University of Coimbra, Portugal.  He also studied at King’s college, London. His international background is also observable in his many MUN experiences :  Best delegate at UCIMUN 2017, best position paper award at LisboMUN 2017, chair at ELSA LxMUN, and head of Portugal’s delegation at RomeMUN.

Camille Chaumont is a student in political science at Sciences Po Lille, and part of the bi-degree Politics and International Relations at the University of Ken. Camille participated in the National MUN in New York last year, and won outstanding delegate and outstanding delegation awards.

Countries
  • Afganistan
  • Algeria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Chile
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Ecuador
  • France
  • Germany
  • India
  • Iraq
  • Japan
  • Lebanon
  • Mexico
  • Nigeria
  • Philippines
  • Republic of Korea
  • Russian Federation
  • Rwanda, Somalia
  • South Africa
  • Guyana
  • Sudan
  • Turkey
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States of America
  • Veneuela
  • Vietnam
  • Burkina Faso
  • Uganda
  • Bosnia Herzegovina
  • Peru
  • Togo
  • Spain
  • Morocco
  • Uruguay
WHO

WHO

Level : Beginner

Tackling unequal access to vaccination in developing countries

Vaccination is a key process to prevent infectious diseases spread by inoculating a less dangerous version of the disease, thus allowing the organism to adapt. According to the WHO, it prevents 2 to 3 million deaths each year. In 2012, the WHO has launched its Global Vaccine Action Plan to further develop vaccination around the world. This plan was conceived to answer a dire truth : people do not get equal access to vaccination. For instance, the measles vaccine coverage rate for the richest fifth of the population in some countries is up to 58% higher than for the poorest fifth. As representatives of your country, you have a moral, a political and an economic duty to tackle unequal access to vaccination. You must offer to your people the opportunity to live without having to fear for their lives, away from the threat of diseases.

Our chairs

Hugo Gravier, 23 years old, French, is a Master in Management student at Audencia Business School. He is a member of the Isegoria association, the one in charge of organizing Audencia MUN; he has been the head of the organization of Eloquencia, an eloquence contest between students. He has participated in MilMUN 2017 and in DAMMUN 2018, in which he got the best delegate award. He gives delegates courses at the United Nations Department of Audencia.

Andreea-Cezera Pletea is a 21 year old law student at the Université Saint-Louis of Brussels, Belgium, of Romanian origin. She has won best delegate at RomeMUN 2018, and has also participated in Université Libre de Bruxelles Model United Nations, and London Model United Nations. She has also volunteered for several causes which matter to her, like human rights, children and education.

Countries
  • US
  • UK
  • Germany
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Sweden
  • Netherlands
  • China
  • India
  • Canada
  • Brazil
  • Mexico
  • Syria
  • Thailand
  • Myanmar
  • Sri Lanka
  • Senegal
  • DRC
  • Russia
  • South Africa
  • Nigeria
  • Ethiopia
  • Malaesia
  • Japan
  • Egypt
  • Marocco
  • South Korea
  • Haiti
  • Madagascar
  • Rwanda
  • Soudan
  • Israel
  • Kazahstan
  • Lebanon